Kenapa Anda Pilih Kerjaya Sebagai Pendidik?

Biasa bila kita ditanya
“Kenapa pilih kerjaya sebagai pendidik?”
“Kenapa nak jadi tutor atau guru?”
“Kenapa nak buka bisnes tuisyen atau bisnes pendidikan lain?”

Klise jawapan… “Nak bantu pelajar, nak bantu ibu bapa, nak bantu ummah, nak ubah pelajar jadi lebih berjaya”

Biasa anda berfikir…
Bagaimana anda nak ubah pelajar?

Tapi…Pernah tak anda terfikir…
Anda dulu yang perlukan perubahan sebelum dapat merubah pelajar!

Jom kita bincangkan Apa sebenarnya perubahan yang perlu & wajib kita lakukan bila kita bergelar pendidik atau usahawan pendidikan.

Jam 4.30 petang ini tau, hanya di Fb Page Tutor Profesional Malaysia!

Kami juga akan umumkan penutupan promo earlybird untuk STPM2019!

Anda dah mendaftar ke Simposium Tutor Profesional Malaysia kali ke-5 ni?

Jika belum… daftar laju2 sebab petang ni kami akan TAMATKAN PROMO EARLYBIRD!

Harga dah lain lepas ni.

Jumpa dalam LIVE petang ni, ok? 😉

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How Big Is Tuition Field in Malaysia?

 

Tuition is serious business
 In Malaysia, tuition has become part of the educational environment to such an extent that nobody doubts its significance anymore. Tuition centers exist in large numbers especially in urban areas. So does tutoring services that are provided by personal tutors. Whether it’s conducted on an individual basis or on an institutionalized form, tuition has become a large enterprise, mobilizing extensive resources and employing many people.

Tuition dominates our lives?

         How pervasive is tuition in our country? According to a 1990 survey in Malaysia, about 83 per cent of pupils will have received some form of tuition by the time they reach upper secondary school. More extensive participation has been predicted in the coming years due to the growth of the industry. Malaysian pupils spend a large portion of their day within the confines of their schools. Nowadays, they seem to be spending an equal amount, if not more, of their time in tuition classes. This development has led some students in the survey to lament that ‘Tuition dominates our lives’.

Business as usual

         Even though the tuition enterprise is acknowledged as an education service provider, it is first and foremost a service-oriented but profit-driven business. In Malaysia, tuition services are made available by tuition centres, academies, training centers etc. Apart from these institutionalized forms of tuition, there are the private personal tutors with a much smaller clientele. All in all, what matters at the end of the day to these tuition providers is the profit derived from the tuition fees.

Tip of the iceberg

         How big is the tuition business? There are approximately more than 2000 officially registered tuition centers in Malaysia in 2003. The number of tuition centres operating without proper registration is not known exactly, but is estimated to be at least matching the legally operating ones. As to the costs involved, it is not uncommon to find urban households investing hundreds of Ringgit per month on tuition alone. It is difficult to assess accurately the size of the industry in monetary terms. This is partly due to the large number of tuition centers operating without proper registration, hence eluding governmental monitoring. Also, many private tutors loathe to divulge their earnings from tuition. Whatever the figure made available officially, it is safe to say that it would be an underestimation of the actual tuition market.

How big can it get?
         Malaysia is not the only country with a booming demand for tuition. In fact, we are not even the nation most obsessed with tuition. Parents in South Korea are reported to have spent US$ 25,000 million (Asiaweek, 1997) on tuition during 1996, which is equivalent to 150 per cent of the sum that its government invests in education. It is also reported that typical households spent the equivalent of US$ 1,950 a year on tuition for each child in secondary school and US$ 1,500 for each child in primary school. South Korea is not unique in this respect. In Japan, there are tuition centers which are so huge that they are listed in Japanese stock exchanges. Furthermore, the tuition industry there remains healthy despite the falling birth rate that has been gradually eroding the pool of potential clients.

The tuition spending

         In most cases, the greatest components of any tuition expenditures are paid for the tuition service itself. Others go into learning materials, stationeries, and even computer related paraphernalia such as CD-ROMs. Usually, charges increase at higher levels of the education system, and individual tutoring is more costly per person than group work or class work. The costs generally increase in proportion to the amount of personal attention that the pupil receives from the tutor. Everything considered, tuition fees could still be a substantial household expenditure, even for the middle income group.

Customer satisfaction a top priority

         However, many parents feel that the money is well spent. They can see improvements in their children’s grades. And the reasons for this aren’t difficult to understand. The fact is, tutors care about their performance in tuition classes. Like all other service-oriented businesses, tuition is an industry where customer satisfaction always come first. If the tutor or the tuition center is not performing as expected, students will simply shift to another provider. Competition abounds. Tuition centers engage in many promotional tactics to retain and increase enrolment. Discounts on fees are given for early registration, leaflets are widely distributed, free seminars and previews are held etc. Even the personal tutors who operate from their homes are not exceptional in this respect. Many of them provide discounts to ‘old’ students who re-enroll. Students from the surrounding neighbourhoods are also chauffeured to and from the tuition classes by the tutors. As an extra convenience to the parents, some of the home tutors also provide child-minding services as well!

Creating jobs & revenues

         Of course, the corollary of the high tuition expenditures is that tutoring gives substantial incomes to large numbers of tuition teachers. Some of them may already have other sources of income, for example, as teachers in schools. But others, such as the full-time tutors rely solely on tuition earnings. And a full-time tuition teacher is capable of making a comfortable living from his or her occupation. Because personal tutoring is mostly a shadow activity, much of the revenues received by personal tutors are usually beyond the reach of government tax collectors. Something which a registered tuition centre can only look upon with envy.

         As can be seen, tuition has major economic implications. On the one hand, it can be regarded as simply a manifestation of public demand. On the other hand, tuition can also be viewed as a symptom of the worldwide shift towards privatization and commercialization of education. Either way, nobody should dispute that tuition is a serious business indeed.

 

Resource: Tuition Plaza

The Potential of Tutoring Business in Malaysia and Asia

Education is a vital part of the family budget – a large proportion of households are savings specifically to support their family’s educational needs

Private tutoring is becoming a common phenomenon in Malaysia. In line with the work of Bray (1999), private tutoring is here defined as supplementary instruction outside the formal schooling system, and where a tutor teaches academic subjects for a fee.

According to statistics from the Ministry of Education, in 2013 there were 3,107 registered private tutoring centers in Malaysia, with 3.2 percent of the total number of (primary and secondary) students enrolled and 11,967 teachers (MOE, 2013).

However, official statistics are not available on those involved in tutoring services outside registered premises.

According to a survey on education and tuition, parents paid RM80 on average a month for each child. Determined to give their children every advantage, roughly two in three Malaysians with schoolgoing children pay for extra coaching…

Some 1,029 people were polled in the survey commissioned by the New Straits Times. Half had schoolgoing children. And two-thirds with schoolgoing children paid RM80 on average a month. When the finding is extrapolated on a national level, it indicates that as much as RM360 million is spent a month on tuition, or RM4.3 billion a year.

Two thirds of households in Asia/Pacific are spending on enrichment classes for their children such as academic tuition, learning a foreign language and public speaking on top of regular school fees, according to MasterCard’s latest survey on Consumer Purchasing Priorities – Education.

More than half of parents in India (54%), Taiwan (52%) and Thailand (52%) are spending on extra tuition classes for their children, closely followed by Malaysia (46%), Singapore (45%) and Bangladesh (45%). Chinese (53%) and Korean (50%) households were more inclined towards foreign language classes. More than 50% of respondents from Hong Kong preferred their children to learn a musical instrument.

Previously, the idea catered to weaker students who needed extra help, but today, tuition classes have become the norm in a society where education is highly competitive and parents are no longer satisfied with relying on school teachers.

However, tuition classes don’t come cheap, especially when there are many subjects, but parents are still willing to pay tidy sums for it.

Many feel that a private tutor is capable of providing that extra push when needed because school teachers have too many classes and too little time for individual attention. Especially when it is a year for major examinations. Burdened by large classes, individual attention is an extremely rare commodity in schools.
Read more at here.

With limited space in good tertiary education institutions and scholarships; parents want their child to stay academically competitive. Some say they have no faith in the education system here with the general consensus being that it is not up to par to other countries.

Furthermore, for many parents, scoring A’s take paramount consideration over any other achievement and they thus strive to push their children into the path of academic excellence.

Customer satisfaction a top priority

However, many parents feel that the money is well spent. They can see improvements in their children’s grades. And the reasons for this aren’t difficult to understand. The fact is, tutors care about their performance in tuition classes.

Like all other service-oriented businesses, tuition is an industry where customer satisfaction always come first. If the tutor or the tuition center is not performing as expected, students will simply shift to another provider.

Competition abounds. Tuition centers engage in many promotional tactics to retain and increase enrolment. Discounts on fees are given for early registration, leaflets are widely distributed, free seminars and previews are held etc.

Even the personal tutors who operate from their homes are not exceptional in this respect. Many of them provide discounts to ‘old’ students who re-enroll. Students from the surrounding neighbourhoods are also chauffeured to and from the tuition classes by the tutors.

As an extra convenience to the parents, some of the home tutors also provide child-minding services as well!

Teachers’ perceptions on the effectiveness of private tutoring in Malaysia

The findings of this study show that teachers consider themselves as positively contributing to students’ learning. In addition, mainstream schoolteachers are willing to supervise students who need extra coaching. Teachers also perceive that students are willing to approach them when they encounter difficulties.

The findings of this research imply that the frequency of tutoring does not mean that society does not trust schooling.

Students are still willing to ask their teachers, and teachers are willing to help their students. But teachers consider tutoring as a supplement to mainstream schooling that can help students to excel in the examinations.

 

Resource: Professional Tutor